Salvador, Brazil: Johnny Miller/Unequal Scenes
Salvador, Brazil

The Economy 2.0 Macroeconomics

Table of contents — Macroeconomics

  1. Preface
  2. How to cite The Economy 2.0
  3. A note to instructors
  4. Producing The Economy 2.0
  5. List of features
  6. Introduction to mathematical extensions
  7. Glossary
  8. 1—The supply side of the macroeconomy: Unemployment and real wages
    1. 1.1 Family fortunes: Jobs, wages, and the global macroeconomy
    2. 1.2 The economy as a whole
    3. 1.3 Measuring the macroeconomy: Output, employment, unemployment, and inactivity
    4. 1.4 Measuring the macroeconomy: Nominal wages, prices, and real wages
    5. 1.5 The supply side of the macroeconomy
    6. 1.6 Wage setting and unemployment (WS curve)
    7. 1.7 The price-setting real wage (PS curve)
    8. 1.8 Equilibrium and disequilibrium in the WS–PS model
    9. 1.9 Studying the economy as a whole: Macroeconomics
    10. 1.10 Summary
    11. 1.11 References
  9. 2—Unemployment, wages, and inequality: Supply-side policies and institutions
    1. 2.1 A scarred generation
    2. 2.2 Measuring the economy: Inequality
    3. 2.3 Unemployment and inequality: WS–PS model and Lorenz curve
    4. 2.4 Labour market policies to address structural unemployment and inequality
    5. 2.5 Labour unions
    6. 2.6 Segmented labour markets
    7. 2.7 Taxes and the WS–PS model
    8. 2.8 Imported materials and the WS–PS model
    9. 2.9 Application: Did a decline in competition increase inequality in the US?
    10. 2.10 Application: Employment security and labour market flexibility in Denmark
    11. 2.11 Successes and failures: Germany and Spain
    12. 2.12 How good is the model?
    13. 2.13 Summary
    14. 2.14 References
  10. 3—Aggregate demand and the multiplier model
    1. 3.1 The ‘great recession’: Hardship at home and at work
    2. 3.2 Measuring the aggregate economy: Gross domestic product
    3. 3.3 GDP as expenditure: The components of GDP
    4. 3.4 Interpreting GDP
    5. 3.5 Growth and fluctuations
    6. 3.6 Introducing the multiplier model
    7. 3.7 The multiplier model: Aggregate demand shocks cause business cycle fluctuations
    8. 3.8 The multiplier model: Including the government and net exports
    9. 3.9 Why is consumption relatively smooth?
    10. 3.10 Shocks to households and the limits to smoothing consumption
    11. 3.11 Why is investment volatile?
    12. 3.12 Investment spending in the multiplier model
    13. 3.13 Application: China’s post-COVID-19 aggregate demand problem
    14. 3.14 Summary
    15. 3.15 References
  11. 4—Inflation and unemployment
    1. 4.1 Cost of living crisis
    2. 4.2 Measuring the economy: Inflation
    3. 4.3 What’s wrong with inflation?
    4. 4.4 Inflation, unemployment, and conflicting claims on output
    5. 4.5 Modelling the relationship between inflation and unemployment
    6. 4.6 Expected inflation shifts the Phillips curve
    7. 4.7 The business cycle model: Aggregate demand, the supply side, and inflation
    8. 4.8 The business cycle model: Demand and supply shocks, and inflation expectations
    9. 4.9 Global oil and other commodity price shocks
    10. 4.10 A review of causes of inflation
    11. 4.11 Application: The return of inflation after the pandemic
    12. 4.12 Summary
    13. 4.13 References
  12. 5—Macroeconomic policy: Inflation and unemployment
    1. 5.1 ‘It’s the economy, stupid’: Government popularity, inflation, and unemployment
    2. 5.2 The role of government: Introducing fiscal and monetary policy
    3. 5.3 Fiscal and monetary policy responses to demand shocks
    4. 5.4 The division of labour between fiscal and monetary policymakers
    5. 5.5 A negative (inflationary) supply shock and the monetary policy dilemma
    6. 5.6 Fiscal policy: How governments can dampen fluctuations
    7. 5.7 The size of the multiplier and the impact of fiscal policy
    8. 5.8 Government austerity policy and the paradox of thrift
    9. 5.9 Monetary policy and inflation targeting
    10. 5.10 Monetary policy and anchored inflation expectations
    11. 5.11 Application: Inflation and the monetary policy response to the Russia–Ukraine war
    12. 5.12 Current costs and future benefits: Understanding investment and asset prices
    13. 5.13 Transmission of monetary policy decisions to inflation: Domestic channels
    14. 5.14 Monetary policy and the exchange rate
    15. 5.15 Application: Policy responses to supply shocks—case study of the UK 1950–2023
    16. 5.16 Summary
    17. 5.17 References
  13. Looking forward to economics after The Economy 2.0
  14. Bibliography